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The Myth of Vivian Maier - Aperture Foundation

Madeline Coleman on Finding Vivian Maier

FVM_1

self-portrait courtesy of the Maloof Collection


Full Disclosure: I haven’t seen the documentary, mostly because I find Maier’s photos to be fascinating enough on their own. Still, I really enjoyed reading Coleman’s review!

Check out more of Vivian Maier’s work here: http://www.vivianmaier.com/

Paul Krugman: Why We’re in a New Gilded Age

"the era of equalization now lies behind us, and that the conditions are now ripe for the reestablishment of patrimonial capitalism."

- Paul Krugman, in his review of Thomas Piketty’s Capital in the Twenty-First Century

(via Moyers & Company, originally published in The New York Review of Books)

livelymorgue:

A Nov. 28, 1973, article described a 40 percent rise in tourism in New York over a similar period the previous year, most of it from Europe, like this tourist, armed with two cameras and a cigarette. “Travel agents say that stories about the dangers of New York have been built up and exaggerated in the European press,” reported Deirdre Carmody, but visitors are hardly deterred. “They come here petrified,” the story quoted Bruce Velsor, executive director of Travellers International, as saying, “but the urge to come here overcomes the fear.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Genocide in Rwanda was a fork in the road not just for Africa but the world

"In their book, Can Intervention Work?, Rory Stewart and Gerald Knaus write: ‘We both believe that it is possible to walk the tightrope between the horrors of over-intervention and non-intervention; that there is still a possibility of avoiding the horrors not only of Iraq but also of Rwanda.’

In remembering the genocide in Rwanda, it’s crucial to acknowledge genocidal atrocities and deadly conflicts happening in places like Central African Republic and Syria. 

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr. is Assassinated
On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot while standing on the balcony outside his second-story motel room in Memphis, TN.
Revisit the life and legacy of Dr. King with a special collection from PBS.
A collection of original posters created for The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross PBS series features quotations by famous African Americans, including leaders, intellectuals and cultural figures. The posters, which can be downloaded, printed and shared, can be found here: http://to.pbs.org/1efp1fy

pbsthisdayinhistory:

April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King Jr. is Assassinated

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was fatally shot while standing on the balcony outside his second-story motel room in Memphis, TN.

Revisit the life and legacy of Dr. King with a special collection from PBS.

A collection of original posters created for The African Americans: Many Rivers to Cross PBS series features quotations by famous African Americans, including leaders, intellectuals and cultural figures. The posters, which can be downloaded, printed and shared, can be found here: http://to.pbs.org/1efp1fy

Inside the Kafkaesque World of the US’s 'Little Guantánamos' | VICE United States

"In 2006, the Bureau of Prisons created two "Communication Management Units" to isolate and segregate specific prisoners, the majority of them convicted of crimes related to terrorism. The bureau secretly opened these units without informing the public and without allowing anyone an opportunity to comment on their creation, as required by law. By September 2009, about 70 percent of the CMU prisoners were Muslim, more than 1,000 to 1,200 percent more than the federal prison average of Muslim inmates.” 

This article is an absolute must read, if you care about civil rights, freedom of speech, prison reform, and/or government transparency. 

“I long so much to make beautiful things. But beautiful things require effort—and disappointment and perseverance.”

—   Vincent Van Gogh (via nypl)

I’m obsessed with photographer Gabriele Galimberti’s Toy Stories, which compiles his beautiful portraits of children from around the world posing with their favorite toys. Check out his website or this Brain Pickings post for more information. 

Why Your Supermarket Sells Only 5 Kinds of Apples and one man's quest to bring hundreds more back

"It’s about apples and it’s not about apples," Bunk says of his work. "I talk about the history of apples, but you know what? I’m giving a highly political talk, because it’s about our agricultural heritage."

And that heritage is in jeopardy. Not only has the industrial food system confined us to a meager handful of apple varieties, but many of the new apples being released, like the SweeTango, are “club apples”—intellectual property of those who bred them. Growers must sign a contract that specifies how the trees will be grown and where they can be sold, and they must pay annual royalties on every apple. The days of farmers controlling their own apples may be numbered, and the idea of breaking that chain of knowledge bothers Bunk. “When you and I interact, our ability to be together on Earth is predicated by all the stuff that people did for thousands of years,” he says. “You and I didn’t invent language. You and I didn’t invent clothes, roads, agriculture. It’s up to us to be not just the receivers of what was given to us, but the givers of whatever’s going to come next.”

         -John Bunker, from Rowan Jacobsen’s apple article on Mother Jones